Can’t Lose Weight? It May Be Your Liver

It’s One Of The Symptoms For Fatty Liver

If you’re doing all the right things and still can’t lose weight, don’t blame yourself… it could be your liver. And it may be the last place anyone, even your doctor, thinks to look. Why is that?

I can’t say for sure but I’m thinking that when someone says they’re doing all the right things to lose weight… diet, exercise… and still can’t shed pounds, they think you’re cheating or lying. If I can take literary license with a Jimmy Buffett song, “Some people claim that there’s a donut to blame, but I know… it’s my own liver’s fault.”

The Fatty Liver Diet Guide
The Fatty Liver Bible & Ezra Protocol

Fatty Liver Disease Slows Your Metabolism

Your liver is responsible for a lot of what goes on in your body. It is the control center for your metabolism, it removes toxins, it supplies nutrients to the rest of the body, it stores excess sugar in the form of fat and converts it back to sugar as needed for energy, it produces cholesterol and certain proteins needed by our body. There are hundreds of functions performed by the liver. It’s an amazing organ! It deserves your attention and your utmost care for its well-being.

Metabolism is a chemical process that occurs in the liver that converts food into energy. That energy is what powers our body and enables it to do all the things it does. Ideally with proper diet and activity there would be a balance between the amount of energy produced from our diet and the amount energy expended by our daily activities.

There are a number of things that can go wrong to upset the balance. About 30 years ago, the most prevalent cause upsetting that balance was alcohol. The excessive use of alcohol caused fatty deposits in the liver weakening its ability to burn fat. The condition was called fatty liver disease.

Heavy Drinking, Heavy Eating: Either Can Cause Fatty Liver Disease

In recent years we find that excessive weight (obesity) can have the same effect on the liver as alcohol. In fact, the prevalence of fatty liver disease among persons who consume little or no alcohol prompted the medical profession to devise the term, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), to distinguish between the two causes. Another term you will hear is non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which is fatty liver disease that has progressed to the point where damage to the liver has occurred.

So what we have here is a Catch-22 situation. People who are overweight or obese need to lose weight to reverse fatty liver disease but the disease’s impact on their metabolism makes it really difficult for them to lose weight even when doing all the right things through diet and exercise.

But do you have a fatty liver? Remember I said, “It may be your liver.” It may not but here are some things that are common among those who do have fatty deposits in the liver.

  • Obesity (with predominance of belly fat)
  • Difficulty losing weight
  • Diabetes (Type 2)
  • Insulin resistance
  • Elevated liver enzymes
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol and triglycerides
  • Fatigue
  • Sleep apnea

What To Do When You Can’t Lose Weight

Remember this… fatty liver disease makes it hard to lose weight but not impossible. The most important thing is not to give up. Equal in importance is to make sure you are doing the right things.

Losing weight rapidly may actually exacerbate fatty liver disease. Be patient. Stay the course.

Follow a regimen designed especially for fatty liver patients. You may find The Fatty Liver Diet Guide a useful resource for choosing the right foods that will help you lose weight but not harm your liver. There is also a wealth of information on foods to eat and foods to avoid in The Fatty Liver Bible & Ezra Protocol, the most comprehensive collection of information on fatty liver disease that I have found.

Move! No I don’t mean pack up your belongings and go somewhere else. I’m trying to avoid that word, “exercise.” A sedentary lifestyle is a major contributor to obesity and hence to fatty liver disease. So when I say, “Move,” I mean get off the couch and move your ***. Seriously, a sensible exercise program should be included in any effort to lose weight. One of several bonuses you’ll get when you order The Fatty Liver Bible & Ezra Protocol is Boost Your Metabolism and Peel the Fat Off.

Be sure to check with your medical practitioner before undertaking any exercise program.

Oh, be sure to check out the fine print:
I’ll get a commission if you buy but don’t let that stop you. Try it risk free.

©2014 Bob Young

 

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Don’t Ignore Your Liver High Enzymes

Why You Should Take Your Liver High Enzymes Seriously Even If Your Doctor Doesn’t!

Liver High EnzymesIgnore your liver to your peril. It can kill you.

A bit dramatic? Perhaps. But my personal experience compels me to use extraordinary means to get you to take charge of your health where your liver is concerned.

You see, my primary care doctor and my cardiologist were both aware of my elevated liver enzymes for over a year but neither seemed overly concerned. In the meantime, my liver was secretly plotting my untimely demise.

I say “secretly plotting,” because fatty liver disease is often silent providing no symptoms or warnings of its devious plans. Even if you have symptoms for fatty liver such as fatigue, nausea, or weakness, these are common to many other possible conditions. “Aha, you must have a fatty liver!” is just not your doctor’s first thought when he observes elevated enzymes or these symptoms.

This is especially true if you are on statin medication for cholesterol. That was the initial thinking in my case. The trial and error process of determining if my medication was causing my high liver enzymes significantly delayed the eventual diagnosis of my fatty liver disease.

But let’s be fair… even if my doctor had jumped on fatty liver disease as the probable cause of my liver high enzymes, my liver could have already been in pretty bad shape. Elevated enzymes don’t necessarily indicate a fatty liver and a fatty liver doesn’t always increase liver enzyme levels, at least, not initially.

The fact remains that time is of the essence and knowing what I know now I would have been more aggressive in pressing for an answer to why I had elevated liver enzymes.

The Real Symptoms For Fatty Liver

Most people will have no symptoms that scream “fatty liver.” According to the Mayo Clinic, in the case of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), when symptoms do appear they may include fatigue, pain in the upper right abdomen and weight loss.

Waiting for these symptoms to appear may allow your liver disease to advance to a dangerous level.

I believe the real symptoms for fatty liver are these but medical professionals may call them risk factors:

  • Obesity
  • Belly Fat
  • Type II Diabetes or family history of diabetes
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Difficulty in losing weight
  • Unhealthy diet (high in calories, sugar, fat)

These are things you know about yourself. Is it you? It was certainly me.

Now consider this: While definitive data is scarce, I found one source that estimated the prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to be about 20% of the general population but in obese persons the number is more like 90%.

Do the math. If you are obese (BMI=30 or more) with a high concentration of fat in the belly area, have a family history of diabetes, don’t get much exercise and eat a typical American diet, you have a very high probability of having a fatty liver.

What You Should Know About Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

The English philosopher, Sir Francis Bacon, said, “Knowledge is power.” Knowledge about your fatty liver disease will give you power to defend yourself against its plans to kill you. (Sorry, I’m being dramatic again.)

Yes, my liver doctor is an important source of knowledge and I am following his advice to the letter. But my doctor’s instructions are pretty broad brush. For example, he told me to lose weight. He didn’t say how and he didn’t mention nutrition. In the brochure he gave me I learned that weight loss is the most important factor in reversing the condition and that it can be difficult (duh!).

I have since learned that rapid weight loss can actually make the fatty liver condition worse. I’ve learned there are certain foods that are liver friendly and foods that I should avoid. There are some weight loss diets that may take off pounds but would not be healthy for my liver.

My quest for more information led me to the Fatty Liver Bible & Ezra Protocol. It’s an eBook for immediate download. It comes with several bonuses, some of which I found useful. Maybe you’ll find them all useful. But even if you don’t they come free with the eBook so why not? And there is no risk. You have 60 days to decide if you want to keep it or get your money back.

Click Here! to discover more about the Fatty Liver Bible & Ezra Protocol and see if it’s right for you.

Oh, be sure to check out the fine print:
I’ll get a commission if you buy but don’t let that stop you. Try it risk free.

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What Are Fatty Deposits In The Liver?

When my doctor told me I had fatty deposits in the liver it was one of those “Okay, tell me more,” moments.

Fatty Deposits In The LiverThat didn’t sound near as bad as what he told me next. You have grade 3 stage 4 NASH (nonalcoholic streatohepatitis) which is fatty liver disease with inflammation and damage. “Nonalcoholic” is applied to distinguish the fatty liver disease that persons who drink little or no alcohol have from the similar alcoholic liver disease caused by excessive use of alcohol.

I was shocked.

“How many stages are there?” I asked.

“Four,” he replied.

“Hmmm,” I thought. “This can’t be good.”

How could my liver have deteriorated that far without me or my doctor knowing it? I had complained of fatigue a few years ago and my doctor “rounded up the usual suspects” (curiously, “fatty deposits in the liver” was not among them) but found nothing.

A couple of years ago routine blood work indicated elevated liver enzymes. Since I was on statin medications for cholesterol my doctor prescribed a different brand statin drug. When that didn’t help, he reduced how often I took it and finally took me off of statins altogether. My liver enzymes continued to be elevated. You can see how this trial and error method of diagnosis can eat up a couple of years and delay treatment. “Try this and we’ll look at it again in six months…” Sound familiar?

I still had no symptoms for fatty liver that I could detect myself. The fatigue had subsided or perhaps I began to accept it as “normal for my age.”

My doctor finally decided we needed to find out what was causing my elevated liver enzymes. He sent me to a gastroenterology specialist who immediately ordered a liver biopsy and that was the beginning of my education on fatty liver disease.

Fatty deposits in the liver are very common.

In fact, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in the world. It reportedly exists in 20-30% of the population in general and 67-75% among the obese.  And it is growing because obesity is becoming epidemic in the Western world.

Fatty liver is the first stage of abnormality in the liver and simply means there is an accumulation of fat in the liver cells. Liver fat is different from body fat. By themselves fatty deposits in the liver are relatively harmless but may indicate that other conditions exist that could lead to inflammation and scarring of the liver.

Fatty liver accompanied by inflammation and/or scarring in persons who drink little or no alcohol is called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is a more serious liver condition in that the inflammation may lead to scarring and ultimately to cirrhosis and cancer.

Fatty Deposits In The Liver

Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is No Respecter Of Persons

NALFD afflicts men, women and children of all ages. The growing problem of obesity among children brings with it a higher incidence of fatty liver disease in them as well. Parents of obese children have an obligation to educate themselves about NAFLD and take preventive measures.

As for the rest of us who are at risk or have fatty liver disease we have a responsibility to ourselves and our loved ones. NAFLD and NASH are reversible but make no mistake; your liver can kill you.

Take responsibility for your health. See your doctor. Be aggressive about getting answers and follow up regularly. Follow your doctor’s orders. Learn all you can so you can ask the right questions. Check out alternatives that your doctor may not know about or neglect to tell you but always check with your doctor before acting on any alternative. Alternatives should only be used in conjunction with conventional medicine with your doctor’s approval; never in lieu of.

The most comprehensive information source that I have found is the Fatty Liver Bible & Ezra Protocol. It’s an eBook you can download immediately so you don’t have to wait. It comes with several bonuses, some of which I found useful. Maybe you’ll find them all useful. I didn’t but that’s just me. But they come free with the eBook so why not? And there is no risk. Your satisfaction is ensured by a money back guarantee within 60 days.

Click Here! to discover more about the Fatty Liver Bible & Ezra Protocol and see if it’s right for you.

Oh, be sure to check out the fine print:
I’ll get a commission if you buy but don’t let that stop you. Try it risk free.

©2011 Bob Young

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Can Fatty Liver Disease Be Reversed?

How To Reverse Fatty Liver Disease

When I found out I had fatty liver disease the first thing I wanted to know was… How serious is a fatty liver or, in my case, NASH? And can fatty liver disease be reversed?

Fatty liver is the first abnormal stage in the liver disease spectrum and simply means there is a specific type of fat called triglycerides accumulating in the liver cells. By itself fatty deposits in the liver are relatively harmless but left unchecked could lead to inflammation and scarring of the liver. When fatty liver disease occurs in persons who drink little or no alcohol it is called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

When fatty liver also has inflammation and/or scarring in persons who drink little or no alcohol it is called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is a more serious liver condition in that the inflammation may lead to scarring and ultimately to cirrhosis and cancer.

The only symptoms for fatty liver that I had were elevated liver enzymes and this was discovered in blood work from a routine exam. The lack of patient detectable symptoms can result in fairly advanced liver disease without you knowing it.

Are NAFLD And NASH Reversible?

According to my doctor, yes, they are reversible! (Big sigh of relief.) Great! Give me a prescription and I’ll be on my way. But not so fast… there are no drugs available currently to treat fatty liver disease.

So how do I reverse it?

My doctor prescribed five things:

  • Lose weight (the single most important factor)
  • Actos (a drug to control blood sugar)
  • Vitamin E (800 mg) daily
  • Fish Oil (2000 mg) daily
  • Oh, and no alcohol.

Caution: I am only telling you what my doctor prescribed for me. You should seek the advice of your medical practitioner and not make any assumptions that my treatment is appropriate for you.

Losing Weight Is The Single Most Important Thing You Can Do To Reverse Fatty Liver Disease

How to reverse fatty liver diseaseLosing weight is very difficult for persons with a fatty liver disease. The liver is important to your metabolism which governs your ability to burn fat. When liver function is impaired so is your ability to lose weight. But gradual weight loss is essential in reversing fatty liver disease and while difficult it can be done with proper diet, exercise and perseverance. You will hit plateaus. Accept it and don’t be discouraged. Just keep on keeping on.

Rapid weight loss could make your fatty liver condition worse. Studies show that benefits of fatty liver reversal can be seen with the loss of 5%-10% of your current weight over a nine (9) month period.

Proper diet is essential to any weight loss program. It is especially important for those of us who have a fatty liver. Most weight loss diets work to help you lose weight but not all are good for your liver. There are specific foods you will want to include in your diet and there are specific foods you will want to avoid. Your doctor may not provide much help on diet. Mine didn’t.

Of course exercise is another important component in any weight loss program. A sedentary life style is common among persons with fatty deposits in the liver. I am not a stranger to the difficulties of maintaining a regular exercise program. The solution that has worked for me has been getting a dog. I know it’s not a solution for everyone but dogs should be walked daily. When my dog died last fall so did my motivation for getting out and walking every day. My cardiologist who talked me into getting my dog in the first place kept asking if I had gotten another dog yet. Finally he told me if I didn’t have another dog by the next time I saw him, he was going to give me a prescription for one. I now have a new dog and we walk every day. If you decide to get a dog please consider adopting from your local pound or animal shelter.

Caution: I am obligated to tell you that before embarking on any weight loss, diet or exercise program you should consult your medical practitioner.

 

Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Closely Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

 

According to PubMed.gov, “Approximately 70% of persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a fatty liver and the disease follows a more aggressive course…” While there are no drugs available currently to treat fatty liver disease, insulin resistance is usually present and your doctor may include drugs normally used to treat type 2 diabetes.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids And Vitamin E Use In Reducing Fatty Infiltration Of The Liver

A study is underway at the University of Edinburgh to see if the preliminary evidence that Omega-3 reduces liver fat and improves liver function can be confirmed.
USA Today reported on a study that was published in the New England Journal of Medicine where 43% of study participants improved their liver function by taking vitamin E compared to 19% who were given placebos.

Alcohol: Don’t Even Think About It If You Are At Risk For Fatty Liver

You may hear of or read about studies claiming that moderate use of alcohol may benefit the liver or prevent the onset of fatty liver disease. Be very careful! The reports I’ve seen regarding benefit were conducted on animals not humans. There was a study done in Japan on men that reported that “frequent and moderate consumption of alcohol has been associated with a reduced risk of fatty liver disease.”

I don’t believe you could find any support for the idea that anyone with fatty liver disease nor has any of its risk factors could benefit by any use of alcohol however moderate. Personally, I have decided on total abstinence.

Discover More About Fatty Liver Disease Than Your Doctor Will Tell You

The day my doctor told me I had nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) I left his office with a little three-panel brochure titled Fatty Liver and Steatohepatitis. It told me the basics in very general terms but I wanted to know more.

The Fatty Liver Bible & Ezra Protocol is a comprehensive collection of information that I have found very useful in supplementing what I’ve learned from my doctor about my disease. My doctor hasn’t provided me with enough detail in the area of diet, nutrition and other natural alternatives that I wanted to know about.

It’s an eBook you can download immediately so you don’t have to wait. It comes with several bonuses, some of which I found useful. Maybe you’ll find them all useful. I didn’t but that’s just me. But they come free with the eBook so why not? And there is no risk. Your satisfaction is ensured by a money back guarantee within 60 days.

Click Here! to discover more and try it risk free.

Oh, be sure to check out the fine print:
I’ll get a commission if you buy but don’t let that stop you. Try it risk free.

©2011 Bob Young

Health and Fitness